Stimulating engagement with bio-based industries among consumers and policy-makers

While some consumers are willing to pay a premium for bio-based products, their engagement, and that of policy-makers, is by and large complicated by a lack of clear, concise and credible information on the benefits of bio-based products. 

Growth in the bioeconomy is limited by a lack of engagement and enthusiasm from consumers and decision-makers. Up to half of all consumers are unaware of the bioeconomy concept, and the rest of them have mixed attitudes about it.

Some associate bio-based products with being natural, healthy and circular – and there is evidence that some consumers are willing to pay a premium for bio-based products in some circumstances. But others are more sceptical as a result of well-publicised information about the links between palm oil and deforestation and other poor environmental management or blame them for pushing up the price of food. The deforestation and food-vs-fuel narratives have dominated policy-makers’ concerns too in the last decade. The situation is further complicated by a lack of clear, concise and credible information on the benefits of bio-based products and their sustainability characteristics.

The challenge: How might we change the narrative on the bioeconomy to accelerate consumers' growing enthusiasm for bio-based products using trusted lifecycle emission data?

Concept 5. Shared vision and voice for the bioeconomy: Achieve an effective, common-sense policy framework for the bioeconomy by creating a united, simple and clear message for policymakers and civil society.